NIGERIA NEWSPAPERS: TODAY’S THE GUARDIAN NEWSPAPER HEADLINES [27 JANUARY, 2018].

Read All Newspapers in one Place - Download our App for free. DOWNLOAD

Below are the headlines found on The Guardian Online Newspaper for today, Saturday, 27 January, 2018.
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
Elder statesman and leader of the Conference of Nigerian Political Parties (CNPP), Alhaji Balarabe Musa, has said the government of President Muhammadu Buhari has failed to protect Nigerians from massive poverty and security challenges in the country.He warned that any attempt by the President to seek a second term next year might instigate a radical constitutional or proletarian revolution that would sweep away mediocrity in government and install credible leadership in the country.

BUY OR SELL OLD AND NEW CARS, PARTS, CAR MATERIALS AS CAR MART NG LAUNCH IN NIGERIA

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Musa, a former governor of Kaduna State, while reacting to former President Olusegun Obasanjo’s memo to Buhari over the state of the nation, advising him not to seek re-election next year, accused Obasanjo of complicity in the nation’s woes today by supporting Buhari’s electoral victory in 2015.He said Obasanjo was part of those that encouraged the victory of Buhari to run an administration that has now plunged the nation’s economy into disarray through poor governance, pointing out that the only hope left to Nigerians now is to use the National Assembly, as the institutional organ that can retrace the nation’s present gloomy condition, by instituting radical laws to check the executive and the Presidency from misrule.
Musa queried: “In the first place, is Obasanjo deceiving us? This is because Obasanjo is one of those who supported Buhari for the presidency as a civilian candidate. Didn’t he know Buhari more than we know him, as they were in the Army together and were doing everything together? In 2015, Obasanjo knew Buhari more than we civilians ever knew him, and he recommended him for the presidency.”
“Now, he can regret ever recommended Buhari for certain reasons. Did he express such regret in his letter? Why does he want us to believe him if he is not suitable for 2019? We already know that Buhari’s government is a failure. Let us make our own decision. The situation in Nigeria today is terrible. Is this a government?” he queried.Musa argued further: “The state of the nation is negative and it has been so since the Army took over since 1966. For some years after Army take over, we have seen traces of improvement, particularly in the case of national unity. But after four years of military rule, we saw the negative state of Nigeria growing even more.
“Now, the state of the nation in many respects has gone so bad. What we expect would happen would inevitably happen. There will be a constitutional or proletarian revolution in Nigeria with the present situation. Whether we like it or not, if
constitutional revolution will not work, there would be a proletarian revolution, because the state of the nation is so negative and people are suffering so much.
“The economy is in the dark and this government is not capable of providing solution.  We must change the philosophy of basing things on self-interest first and public interest second or even secondary. Otherwise, we have to change the social economic and political system controlling all areas of development in the country. “We can do this effectively by bring in the leading role of the state in the economic development to ensure peace, equality, dignity of the human person and progressive development of the country. You cannot do this by market economy, which has never progressed any country since after the world wars and colonialism.”
Besides, Musa explained that the poor state of the economy and security challenges in the country today, which he said the government has allowed to persist through poor governance, is to say the least appalling. He insisted: “There must be a political change through constitutional or proletarian revolution.”He added: “But if a qualitative political change fails, as the change we expected will be a change from the minds of the people, then the next thing will be constitutional revolution. But the change of mind of the people and constitutional change are based on peaceful change.
“But if the two fail, then the people who suffer so much from economic and security challenges may take laws into their hands in a proletarian revolution, as it happened in other countries. The people can checkmate them from using incumbency power or factor in 2019 and bring about a constitutional revolution.
“The constitution and legal system of the country must work to chase away bad government. The people can do this through the National Assembly, which can advance the law into something that can protect the people against bad governance and the present suffering and insecurity.”
He continued: “All governments before Buhari listened to what we were telling them. And when Buhari came, they were shocked, but we will continue to express our minds and if this government does not allow the politicians and the laws to work, thinking that it will only rely on power, then anything can happen.
“The other governments who did the same thing that we are experiencing today regretted their actions through the political change that chased them out.”

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Read All Newspapers in one Place - Download our App for free. DOWNLOAD

On his part, former governor of Anambra State, Dr. Chukwuemeka Ezeife, urged Buhari to heed advice of Obasanjo not to seek re-election.Ezeife said: “It is a good suggestion; Nigerians don’t want to continue to take giant steps backward.”But Plateau State Secretary of the All Progressives Congress (APC), Bashir Musa Sati, described Obasanjo as a bunch of contradictions, judging from the letter.
Sati, in a chat with journalists in Jos yesterday, said Obasanjo, a serial letter writer, has been constantly inconsistent, pointing out that no regime passes without greeting it with the so-called letter.Reminded that Obasanjo did not write any letter to the late President Umaru Musa Yar’Adua, he quickly reminded journalists that he single-handedly imposed Yar’Adua on Nigerians, adding that writing a letter to him would have amounted to writing a letter to himself, because he installed him.
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
Before Yuletide celebration last year, Nigerians began to witness scarcity of fuel. Many thought that the problem would be solved quickly, considering its timing and assurances from government and relevant petroleum agencies.Instead, the scarcity of the Premium Motor Spirit (PMS) has continued intermittently and unabated to the extent that wasting hours in queues in search of fuel is gradually becoming a way of life in Nigeria.
Government and its agencies have given several reasons for the scarcity and efforts towards addressing it, but the lingering queues at filling stations in major cities including Lagos and Abuja have proven otherwise. So, solutions remain elusive. This is because it has been more of blame game between government and its agencies and the petroleum marketers than finding permanent solution to the problem.
While the NNPC has continued to accuse marketers of sabotage and manipulation in the oil sector, marketers have called for complete deregulation of the sector, to allow for healthy competition and efficiency.Some Nigerians, including the marketers have argued that government’s insistence on N145 per litre of fuel is not sustainable, considering that the landing cost, which has also been confirmed by government, is N170 per litre. This disclosure showed that the claim by government that subsidy has been removed wasn’t true.
With the current situation of fuel saga, marketers, black marketers and some filling stations are making brisk businesses at the detriment of many Nigerians who are desperately in need of the product. While some marketers are allegedly diverting fuel and selling above official pump price, some filling stations are sell at night above pump price, after adjusting their metres. Others also hoard to sell to black marketers at night, who resell at higher price.
That is why some filling stations would be under lock and key in the daytime, while black marketers sell fuel beside and in front of it unperturbed. The Guardian learnt that the federal government is not dispose to hiking the pump price of fuel, despite the push by some marketers. It was revealed that it was for this reason that NNPC has remained the sole importer of the product since President Buhari government came to power.Investigation reveals that the activities of the middlemen in the sector is also compounding the problem, because they don’t have filling stations, but they are known for allegedly buying and diverting fuel to the highest bidders in any part of the country.
Nigerians bear the brunt of all these and no one is sure of when the problem will be tackled permanently. This is despite recent promise by NNPC to build more fuel depots across the country to supplement the existing ones that many believe are not enough.Speaking to The Guardian on the development, a Lagos-based businessman, Mr Oke Okodu said that the intermittent fuel scarcity is seriously affecting the economy and human life. “It is time government found permanent solution to this problem. Nigerians are not asking for too much. What is this problem? Is it not a shame that we are crude oil producing country and we are still importing fuel?

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

“I have a terrible experience over fuel scarcity in the East during Christmas celebration. I was buying a litre of adulterated fuel at N300. The fuel spoilt the injectors of my two cars and I hired a car to bring my family back to Lagos after the celebration.“I spent a lot of money to repair the vehicles. Not quiet long we returned to Lagos, the scarcity started again. Is the scarcity going to continue like this without a solution? That is my worry. Today, there is no electricity supply and there is no fuel to power generator,” Okudo decried.Similarly, a black marketer who pleaded anonymity told The Guardian that he engaged in the business because his sister is a manager of a filling station in Lagos.
“Yes my sister is a manager of a filling station. Whenever there is fuel scarcity, she often supplies fuel to me at normal price to sell at black market at unofficial price. I have made good money from it and that has been the practice for a long time now. I will not stop the business until scarcity stops or my sister no longer work at the filling station.”
Meanwhile, the lingering fuel scarcity has become a source of worry and pain to an average Nigerian. Even as the situation appears to be normalising in Lagos with increased supply of fuel, investigation reveals it is not the same across the country.
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
Tony Usidamen is a communications expert, social advocate and lover of music, art and sports. He is the founder of Uburu – an indigenous public relations and marketing communications consultancy that is helping to build strong brands and institutions across. In this interview, Usidamen, an Associate Registered Practitioner in Advertising  (ARPA), Member of the Nigeria Institute of Public Relations (NIPR) and a Fellow of the Institute of Brand Management of Nigeria (FIBM), spoke on the activities of the Nigerian Youth Parliament (NYP) and how the initiative can help young people. 
What’s your take on the establishment of the Nigerian Youth Parliament (NYP)?
I think the idea behind the inauguration of the NYP is good; which is to serve as an organised platform for young Nigerians to contribute to political discourse and decision-making, particularly issues that affect them. This will also prepare them to take up critical leadership positions in the country. It is also in keeping up with the rest of the world for more active youth involvement in addressing the developmental challenges that we face, and towards a sustainable future. Whether or not the NYP has lived up to it’s billing, is a different matter.
In your view, what has been the impact of the NYP to Nigerian youths since its inauguration in 2008?
Frankly speaking, though it is now in its third session, it’s still quite difficult to articulate the direct impact of the NYP as it relates to the lot of the larger youth population. To its credit, it joined several youth-focused NGOs and advocacy groups in promoting the reduction of age bill, otherwise known as the NotToYoungToRun Bill, which was eventually passed by the National Assembly in July 2017. But that is as far as it goes. If there are other noteworthy accomplishments, then they have not been effectively communicated. Truly, the NYP is in a position to do much more to advance the interest of Nigerian youths, particularly in sensitizing them about their role in nation building, and contribution to public policy.
For elected parliamentarians, however, the immersion into the parliament set-up and parliamentary-type debates helps foster appreciation of the complex problems confronting us as a nation. On the other hand, the local exchange and international exposure equip them with the knowledge and resources needed to become active leaders and engaged citizens in their respective communities. Some former NYP parliamentarians, the likes of Rt. Hon. (Barr) Onofiok Luke, who is current Speaker of the Akwa Ibom State House of Assembly, have gone on to occupy higher offices where they are able to impact more people positively; this is a good development.
Do Nigerian youths really reckon with the activities of the NYP?

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Not directly, as many are unaware of the existence of the parliament and its activities. But they, inadvertently, share the ideals of the NYP. Up until the 2015 general elections, the level of political consciousness among Nigerian youths was very low. The election sparked renewed interest in the activities of government and governance, as they could no longer fold their hands and watch as the political elite plunged the nation further into darkness. This shift in attitude is largely due to increased technology uptake and greater social media penetration, which have made online activism possible.

Indeed, the Internet has broken down communication barriers in government-citizen relationship. Today, with a small amount in data cost, young people can weigh in on a social, economic or political discourse through a variety of social media platforms, offering individual perspectives on issues affecting them and proffering solutions to common problems. Unfortunately, it also seems to have sparked off a pervert race to be heard, to be followed etc. The number of Twitter followers, Facebook likes and TRP ratings are being naively used as proxies for popularity and approval ratings. Most commentators, convinced of the “superiority” of their own arguments, are closed to other possibilities outside their estimation. This threatens to cultivate an unfettered, noisy and sometimes meaningless discourse culture where “style” trumps “substance” and “screaming matches” replace “genuine debate.”
And while we are busy promoting our respective agendas, the status quo stays the same, and the common problems that we face as a people remain unsolved. Though we may be seen to score some personal victories, the society as a whole loses! This is why platforms such as the NYP are relevant. Not just in regulating the noise levels and ensuring that the discussions focus on the real issues, but also in generating critical feedback and channeling resolutions passed to the appropriate quarters for concrete action. Like I said earlier, it needs to do much more in terms of public sensitisation, and it must leverage the power of social media for more effective communication.
Do you think Nigerian youths have attained independence?
We still have a long way to go, but we are certainly not where we were some three to five years ago. Thanks to globalization and the relentless work of the youth advocacy groups online as well as offline; Nigerian youths have become more politically aware. They appreciate how much influence they can wield in the scheme of governance and have become more vocal in the demand for public accountability and transparency. The passage of the NotTooYoungToRun Bill is also a step in the right direction, and we must follow through to see that it is signed into law. Unfortunately, for way too long, Nigeria has practiced ‘money politics’ with the biggest spenders calling the shot. The trend is supported by the high level of poverty in the country, which has helped to keep the larger youth population aligned to dictates of the few rich power brokers. The huge cost of electioneering today also means that young people will remain somewhat dependent on the ‘money bags’ in order to be able to actualize their dream of getting into key public offices, at least for a while. As youth sensitisation and mobilisation efforts continue, and as Nigeria’s democracy matures, that chain of over-dependence will eventually be broken.
The CBN governor recently announced that Nigerian youths could now access loans with their academic certificates. What is your take on this?
It is a good development and I commend the CBN for the initiative. Indeed, youth empowerment and entrepreneurship rank high in the agenda of most serious-minded governments the world over. Why not? In Nigeria, young people constitute about 60% of the population and form the bulk of the nation’s productive workforce. Given an enabling environment, and with adequate incentives for small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs) such as easier loan access, imagine how much the youths can contribute to economic growth and development? I must say, however, that like all policies and programmes of government, implementation is key. It is not enough to mouth new policies; the CBN must also put in place a structure that would ensure proper implementation and compliance. The financial institutions must be seen to be open and fair so that suitably qualified SME owners can truly access the facility.
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
No doubt, South African trumpeter, fleugel hornist, composer and singer, Hugh Ramapolo Masekela is an acknowledged and celebrated master of African music. Little wonder, when he cancelled his appearance last year at the Johannesburg ‘Joy of Jazz Festival’, to take time out to deal with his serious health issues, fans were forced to return to his recorded opus for reminders of his unique work.
Born on April 4, 1939 in Kwa-Guqa Township, Witbank, a coal mining settlement near Johannesburg, to a health inspector and acclaimed sculptor father, Thomas Masekela and a social worker mother, Pauline. He was raised by his grandmother, Johanna and was always surrounded by music.
As one of South Africa’s most recognized freedom fighters in the battle against apartheid, his significance as a worldwide symbol against oppression cannot be overemphasized. At age four, he was already fascinated by the celebrity wedding band, the Jazz Maniacs and their trumpeter Drakes Mbau that performed at his aunt Lily’s wedding. By age six, he was singing the songs of the street, and at nine, he had begun attending missionary schools, St Peter’s, where he learned to play the piano.
While at St Peter’s, a remarkable secondary school for black children that became a centre for opponents of apartheid before being closed by the authorities, he was mentored by Oliver Tambo, who later became the leader of the ANC, and Trevor Huddleston, later Archbishop Huddleston, and president of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement.
‘Bra Hugh Masekela’ like he is fondly called by his native South Africans, first became interested in playing the trumpet after seeing the 1950 film, Young Man With a Horn, which tells the story of jazz maestro, Bix Beiderbecke. He had wanted a trumpet after seeing the film, and he approached Huddleston for it, saying: “If I can get a trumpet I won’t bother anyone any more.”
Huddleston managed to raise £15 (a lot of money in those days) to buy the instrument, hence giving Hugh his first instrument (a trumpet) at age 14, and found a black Salvation Army trumpeter to teach him.
Hugh was constantly sat outside the school, making hideous noises. This propelled other pupils’ desire for instruments as well, which was provided to them. This gave birth to what was later known as the Huddleston Jazz Band. Along with Hugh, the band featured the trombonist Jonas Gwangwa, who would also become a star.
Always in one form of trouble to the other, Hugh was a delinquent, always fighting with the teachers or going into town to steal. He was sent to Huddleston for corrective measures.“I was one of the worst delinquents, always fighting with the teachers or going into town stealing. You’d be sent to him (Huddleston) when everything else had failed,” he once said in an interview.

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

As a teenager, Hugh began playing with South African dance bands, some of which toured major African cities. In 1958, he joined Alfred Herbert’s African Jazz Revue and the following year formed his own band, the Jazz Epistles, with pianist Dollar Brand, drummer Makaya Ntshoko, trombonist Jonas Gwanga, and alto saxophonist Kippie Moeketsi.
He continued to enjoy massive help from Huddleston even after he had left St Peter’s and South Africa. In 1956, when Huddleston was in the US publicising his book Naught for Your Comfort, he told Hugh’s story to a journalist, who suggested that it might interest Louis Armstrong, the best known trumpeter of the day.
Fascinated by the story, Armstrong handed one of his horns to Huddleston to give to Hugh and it was straight sent to South Africa. “I sent it straight to South Africa, and I have a wonderful picture of Hugh jumping for joy,” Huddleston had said.Hugh’s skill as a trumpeter increased and so did his fame. He played at fundraising events for the ANC in the 1950s before it was banned, with Mandela among those who came to watch.
With his greatest influences include the performers of American swing, Hugh’s vibrant trumpet and flügelhorn solos were featured in pop, R&B, disco, Afro-pop, and jazz contexts. His style, especially on flügelhorn was a charismatic blend of striking upper-register lines, half-valve effects and repetitive figures and phrases, with some slur bending and tonal colours. Later, he became interested in be-bop jazz and the music of Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker, whom he credited with the development of his talent.
He explored South African styles and avidly followed developments in the American jazz scene as he developed his distinctive Afro-jazz sound. He joined Abdullah Ibrahim (then known as Dollar Brand) and Gwangwa in the Jazz Epistles, who in 1959 recorded the first album by a South African jazz band, Jazz Epistle Verse 1.
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
The National Assembly has assured Nigerians and members of the international community of its commitment to ensure adequate budgetary allocation and release for procurement of vaccines and effective immunization of Nigerian children.
The Deputy Chairman, House Committee on Health Hon. Muhammad Usman disclosed this at a 2-day retreat on Nigeria Strategy for Immunization and Primary healthcare (PHC) Strengthening. According to Muhammad, the House of Representative and the Senate are concluding effective legislations to guarantee adequate funds for vaccine procurement, immunisation services and PHC in general, beginning from the 2018 financial year.
The lawmaker assured the donors and development partners of the personal commitment of both the Senate President, Bukola Salaki and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Yakubu Dogara, to ensuring budgetary allocation and timely release of required funds for immunization and PHC services in the country.

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

 
Muhammad recalled commendable efforts made by both chambers to ensure the safety and survival of Nigerian children stressing that they were convinced that the nation was capable of funding immunization services and other PHC services for the entire citizenry. He commended the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization, other donors and development partners and the ED/CEO-NPHCDA, Dr. Faisal Shuaib for his dynamic leadership at effectively driving the national PHC agenda.
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
After the success of Inagbe Grand Resortlocated on an island off the coast of Lagos,the Ooni of Ife, Oba Adeyeye Enitan Ogunwusi, has perfected arrangement to open another resort called Ife Grand Resort. 
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
Celebrities like their comfort zones and would do anything to stay in there. But here is a show, a new reality television show that has taken 12 acting, music and comic celebrities out of their comfort zones into a home, where they would co-habit and be placed on series of daily challenges…. 
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
On January 18, one of Nigeria’s women in contemporary politics, Princess Aderenle Adeniran Ogunsanya, quietly and simply turned 70. The unassuming, humble, humane and largely unsung patriot, like her late father, given the state affairs in the country….. 
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
The Metrowoman Power Brunch Series has launched a programme devoted to empowering female entrepreneurs. It was held on January 20, 2018 at the Labule Restaurant in Lekki Phase 1. 
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
In solidarity with its members, the Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU), Owerri chapter, has deplored what it termed the dangerous developments playing out in the state universities of Lagos… 
Sat, 27 Jan 2018
A lot of factors are responsible for the current fuel scarcity. First, only the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) is importing fuel into the country presently. Though the NNPC licensed some private depots including the Independent Petroleum Marketers Association of Nigeria 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Sat, 27 Jan 2018
Come next month,February, former governor of Delta State, Dr. Emmanuel Uduaghan, and his wife, Roli, would be celebrating 30 years of saying ‘I do’ at a high octane shindig sure to attract movers and shakers of high society. 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});