The Bay Area is so expensive that 20% of millennials in San Francisco and San Jose are living at home with their parents – Business Insider

Read All Newspapers in one Place - Download our App for free. DOWNLOAD

Tech Enterprise Science advertising Media Transportation Chevron iconIt indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options. Finance Markets Insider Retail Your Money Chevron iconIt indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options. Politics Military & Defense News Chevron iconIt indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options. Strategy Careers Chevron iconIt indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options. Life Entertainment Travel Sports Chevron iconIt indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options. All Coupons Target Walmart EBay Nike Container Store BUSINESS INSIDER BI PRIME SIGN OUT BI INTELLIGENCE World globeAn icon of the world globe, indicating different international options.” Edition Business Insider logoThe words “Business Insider”. * Copyright © 2019 Insider Inc. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service ,  Privacy Policy and Cookies Policy . Sitemap Disclaimer Commerce Policy Coupons Made in NYC Stock quotes by finanzen.net The number of millennials living in San Francisco with their parents is on the rise. Westend61/Getty Images millennials in the San Francisco and San Jose metro areas are living with their parents, reported the Marin Independent Journal. That’s in line with the national average: 21% of millennials in the US currently live with their parents, according to a Zillow estimate. It’s common for American millennials to leave the nest later in life than previous generations because of today’s high cost of living. Rising costs in big cities like San Francisco and New York City are also driving residents away. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. American millennials aren’t in the best financial shape. Take a look at the Bay Area: 20.7% of San Francisco metro area residents and 21.2% of San Jose metro area residents ages 23 to 37 lived with their parents in 2017, reported Karen D’Souza for local publication Marin Independent Journal, citing a Zillow analysis of US Census data. That rate has risen by 65% in San Francisco and 56% in San Jose in the past 12 years, she wrote. Millennials are known to leave the nest later in life than previous generations did: Zillow estimates that 21.9% of the nationwide cohort is living at home — a significant jump from the 11.7% living at home 12 years ago. Living at home gives millennials the chance to catch up in a time when fallout from the recession and high housing costs have created an expensive climate that’s difficult to save in. Rising housing costs are contributing to millennials’ money issues. To buy a typical San Francisco home with a 20% down payment, for example, residents need to earn $303,000. It takes more than six years for the median US worker to earn that much. Read more: 13 mind-blowing facts that show just how expensive San Francisco really is One way they’re dealing with these costs is by abandoning cities where the cost of living is highest. And San Francisco isn’t the only city where soaring expenses are driving residents away. New York is the top state rich millennials are moving away from, according to a new SmartAsset study— and it’s likely in part because of New York City’s high housing prices. Even wealthy bankers are fleeing the city in search of more affordable housing, John Aidan Byrne of the New York Post reported. But housing is just one of four key costs plaguing millennials— they’re also burdened with student loan debt, rising healthcare fees, and pricey childcare. More: San Francisco Arts & Culture Millennials BI Select Chevron iconIt indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options. Close iconTwo crossed lines that form an ‘X’. It indicates a way to close an interaction, or dismiss a notification. Check mark iconA check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction.
SOURCE

BUY OR SELL OLD AND NEW CARS, PARTS, CAR MATERIALS AS CAR MART NG LAUNCH IN NIGERIA